WILD LIFE | Totem Of The Lost Tribe Of Skid Row

$ 3,500.00 

  • WILD LIFE | Totem Of The Lost Tribe Of Skid Row
  • WILD LIFE | Totem Of The Lost Tribe Of Skid Row
  • WILD LIFE | Totem Of The Lost Tribe Of Skid Row
  • WILD LIFE | Totem Of The Lost Tribe Of Skid Row
  • WILD LIFE | Totem Of The Lost Tribe Of Skid Row

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This assemblage was created during the artists residency in the gallery in June of 2015 where he created work inspired by mythologies of his own making.

This piece was displayed with a placard that read:

TOTEM OF THE LOST TRIBE OF SKID ROW

This recently unearthed harbinger was discovered by workmen razing a shelter for the downtrodden on downtown Los Angeles’s 6th and San Pedro, while making way for the Baby Gap flagship store. Totems have been erected throughout history to identify specific families, clans, and tribes. This specimen is said to have stood at the entrance to the land of The Containites. In Containite tribal mythology, it is held that these lands were endowed to them by their creator. Early in the 21st century conflicts arose and much of their Holy Land was confiscated and reallocated to foreign invaders. Many descendants of the Containites hold a messianic belief that in 2020 CE the tribe will rise again and reclaim its sacred land (currently known as Skid Row) and their territorial rights. The unearthing of this edifice is believed to mark the beginning of the fulfillment of the 2020 prophecy. 

Mixed-Media, 2015

104" x 26"

Wild Life is a Downtown Los Angeles painter, poet, sculptor, sign hacker and trickster. Borrowing from both street art traditions as well as Dadaesque absurdity, Wild Life juxtaposes unexpected imagery against underutilized public areas, drawing attention to the inherent misanthropy in the misuse of urban space. The artist works with conventional street art media such as spray paint, stencils, and wheatpaste, yet just as often, is known to use papier-mâché and heavier materials for large-scale constructions and assemblages. Wild Life also utilizes irony and humor in his replicas and alterations of municipal signage that alter perceptions of typically unconsidered urban mundanity. Wild Life, who prefers to remain anonymous (in part due to the nature of his largely unsanctioned work), has never before presented his art in a gallery show. Instead he employs public space as a venue for installations that comment upon the very space they occupy

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